In The Media - Archive 2010

Some of the links may lead to content that is no longer available online.

The Washington Post. Dec. 31, 2010. Charles Clotfelter, professor of public policy, suggests ending the tax deduction for contributions to college sports.

The Bleacher Report.com. Dec. 30,2010. College sports are the most commercial part of most schools, yet they consistently lose money -- why keep them? Charles Clotfelter, professor of public policy, argues that sports are part of the key mission of colleges.

The Economist. Dec. 16, 2010. People get happier after middle-age as Peter Ubel, professor of business and public policy, found in a study of the happiness of groups 30-year-olds and 70-year-olds.

City Journal. Fall 2010. Afghan immigrants to the U.S. are assimilating faster than immigrants from Mexico, but at slower rates than immigrants from Asia, says Jacob Vigdor, professor of public policy and economics.

Axcess News.com. Dec. 14, 2010. Bruce Jentleson, professor of public policy and political science, characterizes the different challenges to U.S. foreign policy presented by Iran and North Korea.

San Francisco Chronicle. Dec. 10, 2010. M. Salahuddin Khan references a study led by David Schanzer, associate professor of the practice for public policy, to highlight the partnership between the Muslim community and the FBI needed to work toward a common goal.

The Duke Chronicle. Dec. 10. 2010. Bruce Jentleson, professor of public policy and political science, discussed the global implications of the rise of China during the last Super Tuesday panel discussion of the semester.

Voice of America. Dec. 9, 2010. WikiLeaks is drawing out the release of the diplomatic cable to gain more attention says Philip Bennett, professor of journalism and public policy.

Duke Magazine. Dec. 7, 2010. A review of the new book by Misha Angrist, assistant professor of geonomics and visiting professor at Sanford.

The Duke Chronicle. Dec. 7, 2010. Public policy studies in among the top 8 most popular majors at Duke, and Director of Undergraduate Studies Ken Rogerson discusses the challenges of that popularity.

ABC World News. Dec. 7, 2010. This report on the costs to the public of death penalty cases cites a study by Professor of Public Policy Phil Cook that found that North Carolina could save $11 million a year by abolishing the death penalty.

Fanhouse. Dec. 3, 2010. Columnist Kevin Blackistone references Sanford Associate Professor David Schanzer in an article stating that resistance to the 2014 World Cup in Qatar may rooted in islamophobia.

The New York Times. Nov. 22, 2010. Sanford Professor Jacob Vigdor is referenced in an article that discusses the challenges of focusing and learning in an age of digital distractions.

KBS. Nov. 19, 2010. Professor Philip Cook discusses income inequality and the "winner takes all" effect on Korean public television.

The New York Times. Nov. 19, 2010. Professor Anirudh Krishna discusses the fluid nature of poverty, where people are moving in and out of poverty over time due to multiple causes.

The Winston-Salem Journal. Nov. 15.2010. Professor Jake Vigdor and Associate Professor Donald H. Taylor comment on the budget proposals of the deficit commission.

The Durham Herald-Sun. Nov. 10, 2010. New York Times columnist David Brooks asserts that President Obama badly misread" the mood of the country, leading in part to the results of the 2010 midterm elections, a start to the tea party movement, and a system that exacerbates political polarization.

The Chronicle. Nov. 10, 2010. New York Times columnist and political pundit David Brooks speaks at the Sanford School and addresses the polarization of Congress, among other topics.

NPR. Nov. 4, 2010. Professor of Public Policy Robert Cook-Deegan responds to the Justice Department's proposal to limit patents on genes, along with Myriad general counsel Richard Marsh and F. Scott Kieff at George Washington University Law School.

The Durham Herald-Sun. Nov. 4, 2010. Visiting Lecturer and former Democratic consultant Mac MacCorkle and Frank Hill, former chief of staff for Sen. Elizabeth Dole discussed the implications of the election at the Sanford School.

The Durham Herald-Sun. Nov. 1, 2010. Professor Jacob Vigdor met with the Durham school board to present his research findings on teacher pay and evaluations.

The Chronicle of Higher Education. Oct. 24, 2010. Academics needs to realize the value of big-time sports for colleges argues Professor Charles Clotfelter.

WUNC 91.5. Oct. 21, 2010. Visiting Lecturer Misha Angrist discusses his new book "Here is a Human Being," about being one of the first people to have his genome mapped and made public on the program "The State of Things."

CSPAN2. Oct. 13, 2010. Bruce Jentleson, professor of public policy and political science, served as a panel speaker at a major national policy forum held on Capitol Hill titled, "Cutting the Fuse: Beyond the War on Terrorism."

WUNC 91.5. Oct. 7, 2010. Professor Sandy Darity possible solutions to the high unemployment rate on the program "The State of Things."

The Duke Chronicle. Sept. 29, 2010. This op-ed compares the potential of Duke Engage to change students to the work of student volunteers with the North Carolina Fund in the mid-60s as described in the book by Sanford Professor Bob Korstad.

WUNC 91.5. Sept. 29, 2010. Sanford Professor Bob Korstad discusses poverty in North Carolina on the show "The State of Things" with Rachel Seidman of the Kenan Institute.

The Durham News. Sept. 28, 2010. Karen Kemp, Assistant Dean for Marketing and Communications, talks about Sanford's upcoming exhibit opening and panel discussion for "The Geography of Marriage," a photography exhibit about civil ceremonies by Anne Weber.

The Editor's Desk. Sept. 25, 2010. In a Q&A with UNC journalism professor Andy Bechtel, Fiona Morgan MPP'11 shares her thoughts about the state of Triangle media.

Carolina Journal TV. Sept. 24, 2010. Professor Jacob Vigdor discusses a policy proposal to encourage U.S. immigrant assimilation.

The Herald-Sun. Sept. 22, 2010. In an op-ed entitled "Very Poor in a Wealthy Country," Associate Professor Anirudh Krishna discusses the causes and risks of living in American poverty. Also ran in the Pittsburg Post-Gazette.

NPR. Sept. 20, 2010. On the program Tell Me More, Associate Professor Anirudh Krishna discusses the rising poverty rate in America, which included 43.6 million Americans last year. At this rate, America could soon have a poverty level equal to that of India.

NPR. Sept. 20, 2010. Professor Peter Feaver discusses the Iranian government's current offers to assist the U.S. in Afghanistan.

The Chronicle. Sept. 17, 2010. Inspired by a recent Vanity Fair article, David Schanzer, associate professor of the practice for public policy, and Don Taylor, associate professor of public policy studies, hold a roundtable discussion about public policy gridlock.

PND. Sept. 17, 2010. The Social Impact Exchange awarded 1.8 million dollar grant from Robert Wood Johnson and Rockefeller Foundations.

The Economist. Sept. 16, 2010. Professor Helen Ladd was referenced in a blog post about better integration in Washington, D.C. for an Urban Institute Paper she co-wrote on school choice's effects on segregation.

Research Report Online. Sept. 14, 2010. Professor Seth G. Sanders joins professors from the University of Chicago, UCLA, and Carnegie Mellon to discuss whether or not the 2010 Census can accurately count same-sex couples.

NC Policy Watch. Sept. 13, 2010. Assoc. Professor David Schanzer discusses how the current anti-Muslim sentiment undermines security efforts in a radio interview.

The Guardian (UK). Sept. 10, 2010. The threatened Koran-burning by extremist pastor Terry Jones was "given more credibility then he deserved" by the media says Associate Professor David Schanzer.

NPR. Sept. 9, 2010. Professor William Darity joins Sam Fullwood, Senior Fellow at American Progress, to discuss alarmingly high African American unemployment rates and the role of discrimination in the employment sector.

The New Jersey Star-Ledger. Aug. 17, 2010. Associate Professor David Schanzer discusses how the uproar over the proposed Islamic community center in lower Manhattan hinders counterterrorism efforts.

Wall Street Journal - India Real Time. Aug. 12, 2010. Anirudh Krishna, assoc. dean at Sanford, is interviewed about his new book "One Illness Away: Why People Become Poor and How They Escape Poverty."

WNYC. Aug. 11, 2010. Sanford Professor Jake Vigdor discusses his research that found that gaining access to computers and the internet didn't necessarily improve outcomes for students

The (Raleigh) News & Observer. Aug. 7, 2010. Don Taylor, associate professor of public policy, proposes a way to address problems in both illegal immigration and social security.

Radio Netherlands Worldwide Aug. 6, 2010. Robert Cook-Deegan, professor of public policy and director of the Center for Genome Ethics Law and Policy, talks about continuing legal challenges surrounding gene patents. 

The Chronicle of Philanthropy. Aug. 5, 2010. Sanford Professor Joel Fleishman and co-author Thomas J. Tierney discuss the implications of the"Giving Pledge" that 40 wealthy individuals and families have taken to promise to donate at least half of their wealth to charity.

Poynter Online’s “Biz Blog Aug. 4, 2010. James Hamilton, professor at the Sanford School of Public Policy and director of the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy, discusses a possible nonprofit business model for ailing Newsweek, which was just purchased by Sidney Harman.

Journalism Lives. Aug. 4, 2010. Sarah Cohen, professor of the practice at the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy, has contributed to the development a new opensource desktop program, TimeFlow, to help investigative reporters crunch data.

The Chronicle of Higher Education. Aug 2, 2010. Ben Wildavsky, senior fellow at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, reviews the new book, "American Universities in a Global Market," edited by Sanford Professor Charles Clotfelter.

Health Affairs Blog. July 28. Associate Professor Don Taylor and Amy Abernethy, associate director at Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center discuss how looking for large health care savings in end-of-life care is not the sole solution for decreasing costs.

Chicago Tribune. July 22. A Duke-UNC study of how Muslim communities counter radicalism is cited in this commentary on a proposed Islamic Community Center.

Education Week. July 21. Helen F. Ladd, a professor of public policy studies and economics, gathers newer data on the impact of teacher credentials and characteristics on high school students' achievement.

Charlotte Observer. July 21. Tara Steinmetz (MPP '12) outlines why nuclear energy is not a good alternative energy source.

New York Times. July 14. Peter Ubel, professor of business and public policy, points out the limitations of behavioral economics and why it is no subsitute for good policy.

New York Times. July 9. Columnist David Brooks discusses several recent studies on children, books and reading, including the one by Sanford Professors Jacob Vigdor and Helen Ladd, which finds that having a computer can have a negative effect on reading and math scores in children.

Los Angeles Times. July 8. The indictment of Al Qaeda operatives in the New York subway bombing plot should boost public confidence in the federal government's ability to neutralize a terrorist plot says Associate Professor David Schanzer.

WUNC 91.5 June 29. The bad reputations of orphanages may be over-rated according to a new study by Assoc. Professor Kate Whetten. Her research in several different countries finds that many children can thrive in orphanages.

Charlotteobserver.com. June 24. Column: Psst, young Gergen just may be on to something (Charlotte Observer). Sanford School Visiting Lecturer Christopher Gergen shares his passion to revitalize Durham’s economy through social innovation.

The Telegraph. June 21. The study by Sanford Professors Jacob Vigdor and Helen Ladd, which finds that having a home computer has a negative impact on the reading and math scores of children in grades five through eight, supports results of an earlier study from the Cranfield School of Management.

The UK Register. June 21. Columnist Lewis Page questions the wisdom of trying to close the digital divide in discussing the study by Sanford Professors Jacob Vigdor and Helen Ladd, which finds that having a home computer has a negative impact on the reading and math scores of children in grades five through eight.

The (Raleigh) News & Observer. June 19. A new study by Sanford Professors Jacob Vigdor and Helen Ladd finds that acquiring a home computer has a negative impact on the reading and math scores of children in grades five through eight, especially in disadvantaged families.

The New York Times. June 16. Some of the college sports ticketing practices examined in the upcoming book Big-Time Sports in American Universities by Sanford Professor Charles Clotfelter is discussed on the Freakonmics blog.

The New York Times. June 15. The Freakonmics blog discusses the new study by Sanford Professors Jacob Vigdor and Helen Ladd, which finds that having a home computer has a negative impact on the reading and math scores of children in grades five through eight, especially in disadvantaged families.

WUNC 91.5 June 15. Professor Jake Vigdor discusses his research for his book on the past and present of immigration in America on the radio show "The State of Things."

The New Jersey Star-Ledger. June 14. Assisant Professor of Public Policy Kristin A. Goss discusses some of the implications of the pending Supreme Court case on gun control.

El Pais.com. June 13. Philip Bennett, professor of public policy and journalism, discusses the economic crisis in Spain.

The Washington Post. June 13. Five myths about gun control, including the idea that more households with guns make the crime rate go down, are debunked by Sanford Professor Philip Cook and Jens Ludwig, professor at the University of Chicago.

The New York Times. May 20. William A. Darity, professor of public policy, African-American studies and economics, offers his views on the recession and its impact on wealth and race.

BMJ. May 18. Anthony D So, director of Sanford’s  Program on Global Health and Technology Access, discusses the need for development of new antibacterial drugs and the need for preventing drug resistant bacteria.

Orlando Sentinel. May 15. Duke undergraduate student Kavita J. Chapla writes on the benefits of the new airport-screening protocols, citing the importance of using intelligence-based, rather than race or ethnicity-based standards.

The (Raleigh) News and Observer. May 6. Public Policy students Betsy Bourassa, '11, and Stephanie Shyu, '10, completed a multimedia project on Muslim teenage females and their feelings on the traditional Muslim veil, as part of a class with Philip Bennett, professor of the practice of journalism and public policy.

WRAL. May 6. Giovanni Zanalda, visiting assistant professor of public policy and history, offers his views on the effect of Greece on the global market in this news story and video.

Genome Web. April 29. Robert Cook-Deegan, research professor of public policy, discusses "gene patent pools" as a way of licensing rights to genes in the wake of the Supreme Court decision about gene patents used in medical testing.

The Chronicle. April 26. Sanford hosts panels on hard-hitting issues, including poverty, as part of the "To Right These Wrongs: Continuing the work of Terry Sanford" symposium, the final event in this year's inaugural series.

Fox 8, Greensboro. April 25. Philip Cook, ITT/Terry Sanford professor of public policy, featured in story about costs associated with the death penalty. Cook says North Carolina would save $11 million a year if the death penalty were abolished.

LA Times. April 19. David Schanzer, associate profesor of the practice of public policy, comments on the continuing controversy in the Muslim community over public denouncements of extremism and terrorism.

The Durham Herald-Sun. April 14. Child maltreatment rates dropped 68 percent in Durham over the period from 2002 to 2008, due to a variety of programs, said Ken Dodge, professor of public policy and director of the Center for Child and Family Policy.

The Durham Herald-Sun. April 13. Visiting Professor of the Practice of Public Policy John Burness will become interim president of Franklin and Marshall College on July 1.

The Economist. April 8. Private efforts, such as private security guards and anti-theft devices in cars, can have an impact on crime levels according to a new paper presented at the Royal Economic Society by Philip Cook, professor of public policy, and John MacDonald of the University of Pennsylvania.

The New York Times. April 1. Susan Tifft, professor of public policy and journalism, dies at 59.

The Takeaway. March 26. Duke demographer James Vaupel recently published an article in Nature about people living longer and healthier.

The (Raleigh) News & Observer. March 25. Now that the health insurance reform bill has passed, Assistant Professor of Public Policy Donald H. Taylor further cost-cutting measures that are needed.

WRAL.com. Assistant Professor of Public Policy Donald H. Taylor explains the components of the newly passed Health Care bill.

NPR. March 19. Professor of Public Policy Charles Clotfelter discusses his findings about the drop-off in productivity during "March Madness."

WRAL.com. March 18. Helen Ladd, professor of public policy, takes part in a panel that outlines out the likely negative consequences of the Wake County School Board's plan to move to community schools.

The (Raleigh) News and Observer. March 18. Helen Ladd, professor of public policy, points out the likely negative consequences of the Wake County School Board's plan to move to community schools.

Fortune. March 17. Director of the Center for Genome Ethics, Law and Policy Robert Cook-Deegan comments on a pending lawsuit addressing issues of gene patenting.

Reuters. March 16. Myrid Genetics breast cancer patent too broad, Research Professor of Public Policy Robert Cook-Deegan says in a recent report.

The Chronicle of Higher Education. March 14. The Great Recession is a threat to the quality of higher education in America, especially the state universities says professor John F. Burness.

The Denver Post. March 14. It's too early to tell if the arrest of "Jihad Jane" is part of a trend in increased homegrown terrorism says Associate Professor of Public Policy David Schanzer.

The (Raleigh) News & Observer. March 9. Associate Professor of Public Policy David Schanzer points out the policy options for handling the trials of terror-suspects.

The New York Times. March 8. Anthony So, professor of public policy, argues against extending patents for biologic drugs.

The (Raleigh) News & Observer. March 5. Poverty is the elephant in the room in the discussion of the recent Wake County School Board changes in school assignment policy says Robert Korstad, professor of public policy.

WebMD. Feb. 24. Assistant Professor of Public Policy Donald H. Taylor comments on the White House Health Care Summit.

The News and Observer. Feb. 22. Misha Angrist, lecturer with the DeWitt Wallace Center, talks about his participation in the personal geomics project.

A book co-authored by J. Alexander McMahon Professor of Health Policy, Law and Management Frank Sloan was cited in a March 1 Chicago Tribune article about companies firing workers who won’t quit smoking. He also was quoted in a Feb. 22 New York Times article about how spikes in insurance prices attract a lot of attention and are a result of a variety of factors.

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Feb. 21. Kristen Goss, assistant professor of PPS, considers the pressures of the tenure track in the wake of the shooting at the University of Alabama.

The News and Observer. Feb. 21. As health care reform in Congress shows new signs of life, Assistant Professor Don Taylor considers the bottom line.

The Hill: Congress Blog. Feb. 10. Associate Professor of Public Policy David Schanzer responds to the latest GOP criticism of the current anti-terrorism efforts.

The News and Observer. Feb. 7. Kenneth Dodge, William McDougall Professor of Public Policy, makes recommedations about corporate executive bonus policies, discussing income inequality in the United States. This op-ed was also featured by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

PBS Newshour. Feb. 5. "Making Sense" with Paul Solman features commentary from Professor of Public Policy William Darity on unemployment and the economy.

Politics Daily. Feb. 1. Public policy student Doris Jwo (PPS '11) writes about the problems with the campus dining halls run by a local union and the current $2 million budget shortfall.

The Chronicle. Feb. 1. Associate Professor of Public Policy David Schanzer discusses his study on anti-terrorist efforts in the Muslim-American community.

The Chronicle of Higher Education. Jan. 31. A new study co-authored by Professor of Public Policy Jacob Vigdor finds diversity in admissions has limited educational benefits for white and Asian students.

The News and Observer. Jan 24. Professor of Public Policy Philip Cook's research informs debate on the cost savings that could result from putting a stop to capital punishment in North Carolina.

Huffington Post. Jan. 22. Assistant Professor of Public Policy Donald H. Taylor joins fellow health policy experts in urging House passage of the Senate health reform bill. Taylor and his peers expect that the bill will undergo significant improvement during the reconciliation process.

Durham Herald Sun. Jan. 22. Associate Professor of Public Policy David Schanzer's research on government risk management and public conceptions of safety serves as an important influence on discussions of Homeland Security

Washington Post. Jan. 15. Professor of Public Policy James Hamilton discusses how leadership on envirnomental issues can be more a matter of personality traits than political affliation.

The St. Petersburg Times. Jan. 12. discusses ways the Muslim-American community is working to prevent radicalism among its members and how law officials should work to support these efforts.

WUNC 91.5. Jan. 12. Kathryn Whetten, associate professor of public policy, discusses her new findings about orphanages in South Asia and Africa, which show that children can thrive in institutional care on the program "The State of Things."

Yale Forum on Climate Change. Jan. 7. Professor of Public Policy James Hamilton disucsses how economics affect news coverage and how the new media can change the coverage of the climate change issue in this video interview.

Time.Com. Jan. 6. A new report co-authored by Associate Professor of Public Policy David Schanzer discusses ways Muslim-American communities limit radicalization among their members.

CNN.Com. Jan. 6. The threat of homegrown terrorism from Muslim-Americans may be exaggerated is one of the conclusions of a report co-authored by Associate Professor of Public Policy David Schanzer.

The Houston Chronicle. Jan. 3.  Senior Research Scholar Joel Rosch comments on the difficulty in deciding how to handle disruptive students in public schools.

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